ByBenjamin Eaton, writer at Creators.co
Resident bookworm and semi-professional nerd. Find me on Twitter: @Singapore_Rice
Benjamin Eaton

Shadow of War has released a never-ending legion of unique villains on players all over the world. The Nemesis system that earned the first game in this burgeoning Lord of the Rings game franchise such acclaim has swelled to include factions and fortresses, but it's the new depth of the organic engine that is the game's most impressive feature. With the staggering success of the Nemesis system, it's a wonder that it hasn't been pilfered by another franchise already. But which gaming franchises could use the Nemesis system best? Let's take a look:

FIFA

  • Developed By: EA Games

FIFA 18 made leaps in the series' career mode and introduced a brand new installment of the Journey, starring returning athlete Alex Hunter. But wouldn't it be nice if these two two disparate modes were one cohesive experience? With a variation on the Nemesis system, FIFA could adapt to your style of play and your past achievements in the game. Commentators could more accurately reference previous games played by you, rather than rolling out the same references match after match.

Fallout

  • Developed By: Bethesda

Fallout 4 shook the Fallout franchise to its core with an unparalleled construction system that encompassed everything from your gear to a ludicrous amount of base locations. It's one of the most personable and popular RPGs available on consoles for those very reasons. Now, imagine firing a teddy bear out of your homemade Junkjet at a Supermutant, only for the nasty green hulk to return later on with a grudge - and a teddy bear mascot.

The Elder Scrolls

  • Developed By: Bethesda

After Fallout 4 and The Elder Scrolls Online, the long-rumored sequel to Skyrim has a lot to live up to. Game mechanics have evolved since the Dovakhin first emerged into the frosty tundras of Skyrim, and while each remaster and re-release of the beloved game is well-received, the sequel should do something different.

Followers in The Elder Scrolls have never been the most interesting characters. Sometimes they wander off and disappear, and the only reason you really care is because they're carrying your stockpile of dragon bones. In a way, they're blank canvases that allow the player to project stories and personalities on to - with memorable results. But wouldn't it be more fun if they had a little charisma? Wouldn't it be more fun if they could disagree with you, maybe even betray you?

Batman: Arkham

  • Developed By: Rocksteady Studios

Shadow of War already resembles the Batman: Arkham series of games, from it's combat system to its chunky art style. The problem with an Arkham game adopting the Nemesis system is in the established gallery of villains that's made DC so successful. The Joker. Penguin. Scarecrow. Part of the fun of the Arkham franchise is the sense of recognition. It's the idea that you're combatting DC legends. How could a randomly generated villain ever compete with that?

What if those villains were incorporated into the Nemesis system? They could spring up on you unexpectedly. Lay traps for you. Wax lyrical with villainous monologues made bespoke for your style of play. Batman: Arkham does an excellent job of entrenching you in a DC universe that feels lived-in and organic. The Nemesis system could take that to the next level.

Assassin's Creed

  • Developed By: Ubisoft

The Assassin's Creed franchise is built on the premise of tackling shadowy organisations by working your way up its echelons through murder. Sound familiar? The Nemesis system would fit Assassin's Creed perfectly, offering the player unique targets that recall past encounters, making each successful assassination much more satisfying.

The question shouldn't be how the Nemesis system would be implemented therefore, but when and where. The franchise has spanned the globe. It's spanned centuries. So, where next? Ancient Rome? Feudal Japan? WW2-era France? Each location and time period is ripe for unique encounters with colorful characters.

Pokémon

  • Developed By: Nintendo & The Pokémon Company

The time is fast approaching when Nintendo will release an open-world, 3D Pokémon game for the Nintendo Switch, with unprecedented levels of customization and free-reign game-play. We dare to dream.

A game of such caliber has been teased for a long time however, and it could be made possible using the Nemesis system. Imagine creating your avatar and heading over to Professor Oak's to encounter your childhood rival: a creation built specifically for you and only you. Your rival could remember times when he actually beat you and goad you with it. You could travel with your bespoke buddies. Your Pokémon could develop dynamic personalities based on your treatment of them - like Ash's catalogue of classic Pokémon. Butterfree. Charizard. Pigeot. Do we even need to mention Pikachu? Pokémon and the Nemesis system is a match made cutting edge gaming technology and pure '90s nostalgia.

Would you play any of the above games, or do you have your own ideas of gaming franchises that should adopt the Nemesis system? Sound off below!

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