BySimon Rune Knudsen, writer at Creators.co
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Simon Rune Knudsen
  • UPDATED: 4/19

Journey to Un'Goro introduced a myriad of interesting cards with strange new mechanics to Hearthstone. We've gotten a bunch of new Elemental minions, legendary 1 mana Quest spells and the Adapt mechanic; an ability that allows a minion to "discover" a flexible way to buff itself.

This guide focuses on 's adaptable minions and how they are best used during play. We'll take a closer look at the best cards with Adapt in the expansion and explain how to make the most of the ability. All to make sure you can build the best possible in Journey to Un'Goro.

Hearthstone Un'Goro: The Best Adapt Options For Every Situation

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]

With Journey To Un'Goro, the Standard format of The Year of the Mammoth began and many cards rotated out, only to be playable in Wild from that point on. These include all cards from Blackrock Mountain, The League of Explorers and The Grand Tournament and dominating cards like Ragnaros, Sylvanas and Azure Drake.

See also

As always, a new expansion and a shake-up of the Standard format meant we saw a myriad of new ways to build Hearthstone decks. Many of them utilizing the game's new Adapt mechanic.

How Does Adapt Work In 'Journey To Un'Goro'?

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]

Whenever you play a minion with the Adapt keyword, the ability will trigger upon play as a Battlecry effect. You will get three of the above pool of 10 options of which you have to choose one for that particular Adapt. Some Journey to Un'Goro minions have the ability to adapt more than once, and these are able to adapt the same buff more than once.

Adapt offers a lot of flexibility, allowing you to tailor your adaptable minions to fit whatever needs you have in the game at hand. None of the adapt options are useless, but some are generally more useful than others. Below, we'll go into detail about each option and their use.

1. Flaming Claws

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Liquid Membrane (Can't be targeted by spells or Hero Powers), Shrouding Mist (Stealth) and Crackling Shield (Divine Shield) brings some defensive capabilities to the Flaming Claw-buffed minion, which might allow it to survive and extra turn and attack more than once. Lightning Speed (Windfury) grants the Un'Goro minion some possibly crazy burst potential.
  • When to pick: This is generally a good choice in the early game, as it allows one of your small minions to trade with a bigger one. You have to be careful of your opponent's removal though. In aggressive decks this option is definitely the staple choice to pressure your opponent as much as possible.

2. Rocky Carapace

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Massive (Taunt) and Liquid Membrane (Can't be targeted by spells or Hero Powers) can make the minion even more of a defensive tool, while Toxic Spit (Poisonous) can negate a low attack score and make a the high health creature trade with multiple minions.
  • When to pick: When it allows you to make a favorable trade. It's a wise choice in many Hearthstone control decks, as higher health minions allow you to stall the game longer.

3. Crackling Shield

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Flaming Claws (+3 Attack) and Poison Spit (Poisonous) for some devastating aggressive potential, Massive (Taunt) and Liquid Membrane (Can't be targeted by spells or Hero Powers) for some sticky, defensive minions that are hard to get around.
  • When to pick: Divine Shield is one of the best keywords and abilities in Hearthstone. Pick it on a high attack minion and you've got a very lethal minion that can make some game-winning trades for both aggro and control decks. Pick it on a minion with Taunt and you've got the best combination of defensive abilities in the game.

4. Living Spores

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: No real synergies here, but that doesn't mean it's bad.
  • When to pick: Living Spores is generally the option with the most value (a "2/2" minion) and you should go for it when you can't make any valuable trades through higher attack, Poisonous, Divine Shield or don't need Taunt, Stealth or Windfury. It's a slow option but the pay off is really great.

5. Massive

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Crackling Shield (Divine Shield), Rocky Carapace (+3 Health) and Liquid Membrane (Can't be targeted by spells or Hero Powers) exponentially boosts the potential value of Massive.
  • When to pick: When you need to stall your opponenet's aggro deck and create a minion he has to trade into. This option should only be used in midrange and control decks.

6. Poison Spit

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Shrouding Mist (Stealth) to plan the perfect poison attack, Lightning Speed (Windfury) to take out two minions in one turn and Rocky Carapace (+3 Health) to potentially trade with several minions.
  • When to pick: This option is good on smaller Un'Goro minions as it makes them threaten every other minion on the board. Just allowing one of your 1 mana drops to trade with a 2 mana drop in turn two can be really, really good. Later in the game it allows a potentially "dead" low mana cost minion to have an impact.

7. Lightning Speed

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Flaming Claws (+3 Attack) and Toxic Spit (Poisonous) for some lethal offense, Shrouding Mist (Stealth) to set up big damage the following turn, Rocky Carapace (+3 Health) to trade in favorably and Liquid Membrane (Can't be targeted by spells or Hero Powers) or Crackling Shield (Divine Shield) to ensure some staying power.
  • When to pick: Windfury is risky in Hearthstone, but on a high attack minion that hasn't been summoned in the same turn, it can wreck face. Also, if your minion has charge, it's a good choice in an aggressive deck.

8. Shrouding Mist

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Toxic Spit (Poisonous) to set up a toxic trap for a big minion and Lightning Speed (Windfury) or Flaming Claws (+3 Attack) if you need to get in those high damage attacks the following turn.
  • When to pick: Shrouding Mist is really versatile. Often you just want a minion to stick around for one turn, and this card allows you to do just that. It can set up combos in the following turn or just make sure your aggro deck puts in a little more face damage.

9. Liquid Membrane

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: Massive (Taunt), Lightning Speed (Windfury), Crackling Shield (Divine Shield), Rocky Carapace (+3 Health) or Flaming Claws (+3 Attack). Basically good to stick on any minion you really want to protect.
  • When to pick: This choice might save your essential Taunt from being hexed or your lethal-threatening Windfury minion from getting a Fireball to the face. You won't be using it a whole lot, but in some situations it can make all the difference.

10. Volcanic Might

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • Synergies with other adaptations: As the most generic option, it works with all of them, but has no spectacular synergy.
  • When to pick: Sometimes +1/+1 is all you got, but mostly you'll either want more aggressive options (Flaming Claws, Lightning Speed) or more defensive ones (Rocky Carapace, Massive, Liquid Membrane). It's not a bad choice, but it doesn't really excel in anything. Pick it if you have no use for the two other Adapt options at all.

Ranking All The Cards With Adapt

Below we're gonna list all the Adapt-themed cards from Hearthstone: Journey to Un'Goro and quickly recap why they're good or bad.

Adaptation (Paladin)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 5/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Quest and aggro paladin.

In questing paladin, this is another cheap buff on your way to getting your hands on Galvadon. And it's actually a pretty good one. In aggro paladin, it's another card to burn through as you set yourself up for a big Divine Favor. Decent and playable in these semi-competitive decks.

Elder Longneck (Druid)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 9/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Quest and ramp druid.

This card is strong! In a druid deck focusing on completing your Quest, you'll most likely have a 5 attack minion in hand. Potentially making this a 5/4 or 5/1 Divine Shield, which is incredible stats on a 3 mana drop. Sorry, Scarlet Crusader, the power creep is real.

Evolving Spores (Druid)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 3/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Token druid.

This is an interesting card, but it's probably a bit too random to be consistently good. On the other hand, we said that about Enhance-o Mechano as well. Token druid has never been really good and you should probably still pick Soul of the Forest and Savage Roar over this card.

Ornery Direhorn (Warrior)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 6/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Questing warrior and Taunt warrior.

Warrior has received a lot of powerful Taunt cards in the last expansions, and with their Quest, this card fits right in. It's not the most powerful one of the bunch, but it's strong enough to see some play in constructed control warrior decks.

Pterrordax Hatchling

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 2/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Not any specific deck.

This card isn't good. A 5/2, 3/3 or even 2/2 Divine Shield is not what you're looking for in Hearthstone if you intend to win games. Can work as a budget option if you're just starting out but beside that.. no. Just no.

Ravasaur Runt

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 7/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Questing hunter, zoolock or aggro paldin.

Alleycat or Lost in the Jungle into this card is a devastating opening that's too good to pass up on. Should only be used in heavily minion-based decks as the downside of playing a 2/2 without activating the ability is pretty grim. But stick it in the above decks and you should be golden.

Vicious Fledgling

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 4/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: We're not really sure.

Cards that get a buff when attacking a hero rarely see play, as they're too inconsistent to actually work. We're afraid that's going to be the case with Vicious Fledgling as well as the stats does not make up for the lackluster ability. With that said, it does have the potential to spiral out of control if it ever touches the opponent's face, which kind of makes it interesting.

Ravenous Pterrordax (Warlock)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 7/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Zoo warlock all the way.

Normally you'd rather not destroy your own minions, but in a sadistic warlock deck it just might be the right thing to do. With a possible board full of 1/1 tentacles from Forbidden Ritual or a guy like Possessed Villager around it seems like a small price to pay.

Because with a bit of luck that 1/1 minion can make the Ravenous Pterrordax into a 4 mana 7/7, 7/4 Windfury or 7/4 Divine Shield. Now that is strong in a zoo deck!

Galvadon (Paladin Quest)

  • How good: 5/10 explorer's hats
  • What deck does it support: Aggro paladin with lots of minions and buffs. Might work as a finisher in midrange paladin as well, as long as the deck contains enough buffs.

The ultimate adapter! Yeah, we don't really know about this card. Of course, Galvadon is powerful, but getting him can be difficult as completing The Last Kaleidosaur puts some strange limitations on your paladin deck. At the moment, cards that buff your minions are rarely played as they are too easy to punish through removal, and having to play six of them seems like a stretch.

Perhaps that will change in Journey to Un'Goro. In any case Galvadon is definitely a fun card that allows for some crazy combinations of adaptations, both offensive and defensive.

Lightfused Stegodon (Paladin)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]

Lightfused Stegodon can definitely be powerful in the right situation, but unfortunately that situation is going to be a somewhat rare one. With Stand Against Darkness costing five mana, you'll need 9 mana to pull of this combination and most of your guys will still be 1/1s that are easily cleared.

If Muster for Battle, Quartermaster and Warhorse Trainer were still in Standard, or if Lighfused Stegodon's stats were reasonable then the card would be a lot better.

Update: Vinecleaver made this card stronger, though it's still inconsistent.

Thunder Lizard (Neutral)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 5/10 explorer's hats
  • What decks does it support: An elemental deck, probably of the shaman or mage kind.

Thunder Lizard is a decent card that can end up as a 3/3 Divine Shield or 3/6 for 3 mana. Pretty good. However, the card breaks your chain of summoning elementals making your 4 drop (possibly Tol'vir Stoneshaper) a lot weaker.

It can work in a more aggressively oriented elemental deck where Tol'vir Stoneshaper or Tar Creeper aren't included. But as it looks now, elemental-themed decks seem to be leaning towards midrange and control, leaving Thunder Lizard in the cold.

Crackling Razormaw (Hunter)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 8/10 explorer's hats
  • What decks does it support: Hunters of all kinds

Strong. Playing this on turn two, adapting Fiery Bat, Alley Cat or Small Raptor is a crazy tempo play. It's also very likely to happen with all the 1 mana minions hunters are using because of their quest.

Late game, it can still be a tide-changer, since giving your Savannah Highmane Windfury or Divine Shield is super effective.

Volcanosaur (Neutral)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 6/10 explorer's hats
  • What decks does it support: Midrange hunter (it's a Beast) and beast druid (it's a Beast!)

A good, flexible card that can just make the cut in some budget Hearthstone decks. Double adapt can be really powerful and adds some nice consistency to the ability. Combining defensive adaptations like Taunt and +3 Health can get you out of a tough spot while combining something like Stealth and Windfury can help you finish the game.

The 7 mana slot is a competitive one though and almost too late game for any hunter deck, as Savannah Highmanes are still too good to pass up.

Gentle Megasaur (Neutral)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 6/10 explorer's hats
  • What decks does it support: Murlocs in any shape or form, especially the Quest-supporting murloc shaman.

A big board of murlocs is usually a handful because of the way they synergize with each other, and with an added adaptation to all of them they'll become deadly. The problem is getting to the point where you actually have a big board.

Verdant Longneck (Druid)

[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
[Credit: Blizzard Entertainment]
  • How good: 6/10 explorer's hats
  • What decks does it support: Beast druid and questing druid.

The stats here have potential, as a possible 5/7 minion for five mana isn't too shabby. Verdant Longneck is competing in the 5 mana slot against the flexible and consistent Druid of the Claw though, which will be the better option in anything else than Quest druid where you need the 5 attack.

What do you think about the Adapt mechanic?

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