ByNicholas Montegriffo, writer at Creators.co
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Nicholas Montegriffo

Is there an old SNES hiding at the bottom of your closet? A Dreamcast in the back of the attic? Might be time to dig it out and dust it off, because your old console could be worth quite a bit of money nowadays.

have been around for a while now, and while most of us can't wait to upgrade to the latest shiny new console every few years, there are actually a sizable community of retro-gamers out there who love the oldies.

Sure, it's easy enough to find emulators that run old games on modern PCs, but plenty of collectors will settle for nothing less than the genuine article—that means they'll shell out big money for the original console.

If you've got a classic console in good condition, you could stand to make some serious cash. Check our list below to see if you're in the money:

Release year and price listed for North America. Price range representative of varying condition of the console.

1. Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES)

[Credit: Nintendo]
[Credit: Nintendo]
  • Year: 1991
  • Original Retail Price: $199 ($355.73 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $36-$140

Nintendo's beloved 16-bit offering can be had for just under $40 for a beat-up box but the price can climb considerably depending on condition. Throw in controllers and games for extra value. Sadly, the plastic used with this console doesn't age too well, with a tendency to yellow over the years.

If you happen to own a '1CHIP' version, considered to be the best out there, then you can easily fetch over $130 from the discerning collector. Here's how to check if your SNES is one of these prized versions.

2. Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

[Credit: Nintendo]
[Credit: Nintendo]
  • Year: 1985
  • Original Retail Price: $299 for US Deluxe Set ($676.08 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $75-$400

Although not as powerful as the SNES, Nintendo's older 8-bit console is rarer and therefore fetches a better price on the market, starting from around 80 bucks for the console alone. With controllers and a few games, you could easily shoot for between 100-150 dollars, with the highest price reserved for the US Deluxe Set in the original packaging.

3. Sega Genesis

[Credit: Sega]
[Credit: Sega]
  • Year: 1989
  • Original Retail Price: $189 ($371.06 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $20-$100

The Sega Genesis (or Mega Drive, for any sophisticated Brits out there) was a huge hit in the American market and consequently not particularly rare. However, the Sega CD and 32X add-ons are harder to find, often selling for a higher price than the Genesis itself.

4. Nintendo 64

[Credit: Nintendo]
[Credit: Nintendo]
  • Year: 1996
  • Original Retail Price: $199 ($309.56 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $30-$60

The price for a second hand N64 can vary depending on condition, color, and whether it comes with cables and controllers. Nonetheless, it's worth it for retro gamers who want to experience the best console for cartridge tilting.

5. Sony PlayStation

[Credit: Sony]
[Credit: Sony]
  • Year: 1995
  • Original Retail Price: $299 ($479.07 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $30-$150

Sony's launch console was wildly popular and had a ton of great exclusive games, so it can still net you a sizable amount depending on condition, with boxed sets fetching over $100. The slimmer PSone re-release attracts comparable bids on eBay.

6. Sega Saturn

[Credit: Sega]
[Credit: Sega]
  • Year: 1995
  • Original Retail Price: $299 ($479.07 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $30-$180

The Sega Saturn is generally regarded as a failure for Sega due to poor management and marketing, but it's still well regarded among collectors for some great exclusive games, including Nights into Dreams..., the Panzer Dragoon series, and Virtua Fighter.

7. Nintendo GameCube

[Credit: Nintendo]
[Credit: Nintendo]
  • Year: 2001
  • Original Retail Price: $199.99 ($279.06 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $20-$120

The GameCube might have been the cheapest console ever released with inflation taken into account. Selling one second hand won't get you much for just the console, but with working cables and controllers the price quickly shoots up.

8. Xbox

[Credit: Microsoft]
[Credit: Microsoft]
  • Year: 2001
  • Original Retail Price: $299.99 ($418.60 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $16-$200

Microsoft's debut held the middle ground in popularity between the GameCube and PS2, largely thanks to some killer titles like Halo 2.

9. PlayStation 2

[Credit: Sony]
[Credit: Sony]
  • Year: 2000
  • Original Retail Price: $299 ($423.89 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $30-$180

Everybody loved the PS2, which dominated the 6th generation console wars with a strong lineup from the Metal Gear Solid, Grand Theft Auto, and Final Fantasy franchises. You can easily get around 50 bucks for the original black fattie in working condition, and even more if your PS2 is an unusual color, such as gold or ocean blue.

10. Dreamcast

[Credit: Sega]
[Credit: Sega]
  • Year: 1999
  • Original Retail Price: $199 ($291.71 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $60-$180

The Dreamcast performed poorly and led to Sega pulling out of the console wars, but despite this it's appreciated by video game historians for being well ahead of its time. Because of its relative rarity now, it's hard to find one for less than 60 bucks second hand. But if you're lucky to have one in an unopened box you can get several hundred dollars for it, easy.

11. Neo Geo AES

[Credit: SNK]
[Credit: SNK]
  • Year: 1990
  • Original Retail Price: $649.99 ($1210.73 adjusted for inflation)
  • Now Sells For: $200-$900

The Neo Geo AES was bank-breakingly expensive at the time yet maintained a dedicated following thanks to its arcade perfect technology and SNK's great game roster. It also fetches a decent price on the modern collectors market, with a good condition playable set selling for nearly a grand in today's money. Some rare Neo Geo games alone can go for hundreds of dollars.

Is There Gold Hiding In Your Closet?

[Credit: Sony]
[Credit: Sony]

If you've got a classic console and were lucky or careful enough not to get it damaged, it's possible to make a tidy buck from the old box, especially with controllers and cables bundled in.

Japan still loves classic Sega consoles so much it personified them in an anime series. Check out Mega Drive, Saturn and more as high school girls:

I have to admit that I could never bring myself to sell off my old Genesis. It would feel like saying goodbye to an old friend, and I'd hate to close off the possibility of booting it up for one more game of Streets of Rage or Sonic 2.

Could you bring yourself to sell your old consoles or is the nostalgia for those good gaming moments just too strong?


(Source: eBay)

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