ByMarcus O'Shea, writer at Creators.co
Resident RPG nerd and SoulsBorne fanatic. Can be spotted by their floofy hair.
Marcus O'Shea

The next time you feel like bragging about having built your own desktop, you might want to think about how you match up to this enterprising group of criminals in the Marion Correctional Institute of Ohio, who managed to build custom PCs out of junk parts and hide them in the ceiling of their prison.

How Prison Inmates Built Two Custom PCs In The Ceiling Of Their Jail

A shot of the patch job that allowed the prisoners to access the network [Credit: Ohio Inspector General's Report]
A shot of the patch job that allowed the prisoners to access the network [Credit: Ohio Inspector General's Report]

Two prisoners, Adam Johnston and Scott Sprig found themselves in a bit of trouble recently, when staff discovered two fully functioning computers hidden in the ceiling of the institution.

The prisoners managed to assemble and install the hardware when they were tasked with disassembling decommissioned computers for recycling and spare parts. Instead of getting rid of all the hardware like they were instructed to however, the pair managed to sneak enough parts 1,100 feet across the prison to build two computers, complete with network cards and cables.

Adam and Scott then used stolen login info from a guard in the prison to enter the institution's network, which they and their friends used to commit credit card fraud, identity theft and to look up porn and instructions for how to make drugs, explosives and plastics.

The ceiling space where the computers were stored. [Credit: Ohio Inspector General's Report]
The ceiling space where the computers were stored. [Credit: Ohio Inspector General's Report]

Unfortunately for the resourceful duo and their buds, their greed was their undoing. When the computer exceeded its daily data threshold multiple times, IT admins in the building began to notice that the guard who they'd stolen the login from wasn't at work on several of the occasions he'd been logged in. After a more thorough investigation, they tracked down the secret computers to a hidden hidey-hole in the ceiling of the prison's admin area.

Ohio Inspector General Randall J. Meyer was shocked at the prisoner's ingenuity, stating in an interview with ABC 6:

"It surprised me that the inmates had the ability to not only connect these computers to the state's network but had the ability to build these computers. They were able to travel through the institution more than 1,100 feet without being checked by security through several check points, and not a single correction's staff member stopped them from transporting these computers into the administrative portion of the building."

It's currently unknown what punishment the prisoners might be facing, although if there's one thing we'd bet on, they're probably not going to be allowed near any computers for a long time. Shame, bet they'd be great at Prison Architect.

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