ByPeter Moulding, writer at Creators.co
Peter Moulding

What #MarioKart loves to do is send you flying on top of mountains, skidding around fire breathing Bowsers and driving over obstacle peppered islands. Part of a hugely versatile franchise, these #Nintendo games have always pushed the boundaries when it comes to world design.

Now that Mario Kart is well established in the veteran category of games, being first launched in 1992, we're allowed to get real ugly and start to explore these world designs off-camera, revealing what the developers didn't want us to see. We're gonna revisit Luigi's mansion, but from a totally different angle!

Mario Kart's Worlds Are Bigger Than They Look

It just keeps getting bigger
It just keeps getting bigger

The first thing you notice is simply how big the developers made these game worlds, faraway from the rich, but small, linear stages that we experience when playing. This, for example, is the Coconut Mall in Mario Kart Wii seen from a bird's eye view. Note how small it becomes next to the ocean and the eery black void behind.

Woah!
Woah!

I bet you weren't expecting that. Pulling out on the Rainbow Road stage reveals the entire planet and a massive 2D starry night that you can explore.


This Is Where It Gets Creepy

We didn't expect that either
We didn't expect that either

Going underground on the Nintendo DS uncovers a siamese twin version of a Rocky Wrench. The underground twin is a straight up copy of its sibling but from this angle it couldn't look any more disturbing.

A purple horizon
A purple horizon

Cheep Cheep Beach on Mario Kart DS is a mud and sand covered classic. In the game you can't see past the trees, but here you can see that what lies behind is a strange purple ocean.


Revealing Developer Secrets and Shortcuts

Very sneaky indeed
Very sneaky indeed

Here, also on the DS version, we get to take a peek inside Princess Peach's castle, but what we find is a door that extends over two floors of the building. I wonder how many more double doors are out there.

Nothing to see here
Nothing to see here

When you look behind Luigi's mansion on Double Dash, you can see that there really isn't much going on in there. This is a pretty good example of how the developers were looking to save on memory with this game.

Saving it for another day
Saving it for another day

Pretty often I can imagine that developers decide not to use certain elements of the game and so they get deleted. But, fly out behind the starry curtain on the Rainbow Road stage in Double Dash and you can see a heart element, which was quite obviously meant for the main game, left out of the way and totally forgotten by the developers.


You can watch the full video of the Youtuber Shesez uncovering more strange and interesting things from behind the scenes of Mario Kart here!

What do you make of these crazy developer secrets?

For more things Mario, check out the video below!