ByMarcus O'Shea, writer at Creators.co
Resident RPG nerd and SoulsBorne fanatic. Can be spotted by their floofy hair.
Marcus O'Shea

Australia's a funny old place when it comes to censorship. The island may be full of horrible, deadly wildlife (and Australians) but the government's always rivaled Germany for being a bit sensitive to anything out of the ordinary in . Fallout 3 got in trouble for portraying morphine as a helpful medicine, Silent Hill: Homecoming got flak for its torture scenes and now Outlast 2 is on the chopping block.

'Outlast 2' Has Been Refused Classification In Australia For Its "Ritualistic Orgy" Scene

Australian censors were fine with this scene, as they considered it a normal depiction of everyday life on the Central Coast [Credit: Red Barrel Games]
Australian censors were fine with this scene, as they considered it a normal depiction of everyday life on the Central Coast [Credit: Red Barrel Games]

Word broke on the 15th of March that the terrifying sequel to the break-out horror hit has been refused classification in Australia, which essentially leaves it banned unless the objectionable content is cut.

The biggest sticking point for Australia's censors was a scene in which a group of mutated hillbilly types engage in "what appears to be a ritualistic orgy" according to one source.

In the scene, the main character Blake is attempting to stop a ritual involving his wife, who is chained to a platform and surrounded by the mutant residents of the rural town. Blake is attacked by a nude female mutant, who pushes him to the ground and engages in some 'unwilling intercourse' with the protagonist.

Red Barrel Games sent a spokesman, but the board for some reason found him unpersuasive. [Credit: Red Barrel Games]
Red Barrel Games sent a spokesman, but the board for some reason found him unpersuasive. [Credit: Red Barrel Games]

Most of the action occurs off-screen, due to the first-person view, but that wasn't enough to dissuade the Australian censors, who refused to even give the game an 18+ rating, claiming that it violated standards that don't allow games to:

"depict, express or otherwise deal with matters of sex, drug misuse or addiction, crime, cruelty, violence or revolting or abhorrent phenomena in such a way that they offend against the standards of morality, decency and propriety generally accepted by reasonable adults to the extent that they should not be classified".

Oddly enough, the original Outlast scraped by with an 18+ rating, despite similar levels of sexual violence and a castration scene.

Too Extreme For 18+ — How Australia's Classification Works

Setting for a horror game or the town I grew up in? Not entirely sure. [Credit: Red Barrel Games]
Setting for a horror game or the town I grew up in? Not entirely sure. [Credit: Red Barrel Games]

Australia actually lacked even an 18+ rating for games until 2013, with the highest rating being 15+, which led to many games, especially titles, being banned in the country. The 18+ rating was only introduced after years of lobbying from various groups to apply the same standards to games as the government applies to film.

The new classification hasn't done much to slow the country's overzealous classification board however. Games like State of Decay and Saints Row IV were refused classification for having positive depictions of drug effects. Strangely, films like Lucy, where drugs give you superpowers and turn you into god, remained unscathed. It seems Australia still has a double standard going on.

Would you smuggle a copy to play Outlast 2? Let us know in the comments!

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