ByNick Buxton, writer at Creators.co
A Gameboy who wants to become a Gameman!
Nick Buxton

From his first virtual appearance back in 2002 in "The Mystery of the Mummy" to his most recent adventure in "Crimes & Punishments" in late 2013, the detective of Scotland Yard and one of Britain's most well known fictional characters, Sherlock Holmes, has become somewhat of a regular in the video game world. Ranging from the Nintendo DS to the current generation, Sherlock has had his fair share of games on all consoles. Back on May 8th, Frogwares, the developers of the "Sherlock Holmes Adventures" games, announced the latest addition to the franchise: "Sherlock Holmes: The Devil's Daughter".

The new and possibly final addition of the series sees Sherlock Holmes in a new, interactive open-world, with multiple new stories and quests to follow in London. However, for the first time, Sherlock is involved in a story which affects his own family, proving that this game could bring a more emotional side to the famous detective. While most stories are set in London, the whole game has a single main plot where all loose ends are tied up in a dramatic finale. All these promising features make it sound like quite an improvement to its predecessor, "Crimes and Punishments".

Made back in 2013, seems a long time ago...
Made back in 2013, seems a long time ago...

One main mechanic for the upcoming adventure game is what's known as Sherlock Vision. (Not to be mixed up with the Batman: Arkham Detective Vision.) This mechanic is done through interrogation and questioning of witnesses and the people of London, allowing you to put the pieces of the crime together yourself. Not only that, but through the game, you will regularly find clues in houses and places of interest. These are all then congregated into Sherlock's "Mind Palace", where you can mix the clues and work out the crimes. The game is entirely based around moral choice, intelligence and cunning, making it a must have for any puzzle and mystery game lover.

Clues can help you solve puzzles, how spiffing!
Clues can help you solve puzzles, how spiffing!

Furthermore, similar to Assassin's Creed: Syndicate last October, "Sherlock Holmes: The Devil's Daughter" allows you to freely move around various areas of London and explore the game world. However, the design is more hub-based than sandbox as each main section is cut off by a loading time (so not as open as Assassin's Creed). You can travel between these places by horse-carriage or just by walking around London. Although this may be disappointment to some, there is still a free-roam style in each hub area, with many buildings with interiors and constant stories to eavesdrop on, another new mechanic for possible side-quests, although this is not certain yet. Every person in London can be interacted with, making the game feel more alive and making the surrounding people that much more intriguing.

Very 19th Century London!
Very 19th Century London!

Needless to say, the new addition to the Sherlock Holmes games may top even Rockstar's very own detective game "LA Noire" five years ago, which changed the detective gaming style with exceptional facial expressions and also an open-world theme. However, we know very little about the story itself, which is something everyone can experience on release.

"Sherlock Holmes: The Devil's Daughter" is out on June 10th on PS4, Xbox One and PC.

What would you really like to see in a Sherlock Holmes video game?