ByYaw Amanquah, writer at Creators.co
freelance game designer | osiahene.itch.io | twitter.com/yawoada
Yaw Amanquah

Kickstarter has been the source of some of the most successful indie games as of late. However, while I expect huge Kickstarter projects like Yooka-Laylee to have mass appeal I was surprised to see Undertale become a mainstream success. So I thought it would be interesting to highlight four Kickstarter games that might be the next big thing.

OMORI

OMORI is a surreal psychological horror RPG directed, written, and illustrated by artist and fashion designer OMOCAT. OMORI features an original soundtrack composed by Slime Girls and Space Boyfriend that aims to create a lastingly meaningful experience.

OMORI features a turn-based battle system that is reminiscent of the Mother series but the tone of the game has more in common with Yume Nikki. What put OMORI on my radar was the compelling nature of the premise and the visuals that invoke feelings of nostalgia and surrealism.

Welcome to WHITE SPACE. Your name is OMORI and you've been living here for as long as you can remember. Everything is bright white; there aren't any walls. A black lightbulb hangs from the ceiling… wherever it is. There's a floor but it's always cold. The warmest thing here is probably your laptop. You don't mind though. You have a blanket, a laptop, a cat, a sketchbook, and a tissue box. You have everything you need. On good days, your neighbors invite you over for a visit. "How can they have fun with someone as horrible as me?" You miss them now. When will they come again? Maybe today will be a good day! Or maybe today is a day for sleeping.

Wandersong

Wandersong is an adventure game developed by Greg Lobanov with an original soundtrack by Rogue Legacy composer Gordon McGladdery. Wandersong visually reminds me of a diorama with characters and environments resembling paper craft.

What makes Wandersong unique is the singing mechanic which is used to interact with NPCs and solve puzzles. The singing in Wandersong is different from the instruments in The Legend of Zelda series because instead of memorizing and re-using songs the player must figure out how to apply music to each situation.

Eons ago, the goddess Eya set the universe into motion with her music. Now, as she does every epoch or so, she's planning to sing a new song, effectively resetting existence. To preserve the Earth, the bard will have to go on a journey around the world, visiting the planet's spirit guides and collect pieces of a mysterious melody called the Earthsong.

Radio the Universe

Radio the Universe is a challenging and atmospheric sci-fi action game developed single-handedly by sixe. Radio the Universe has mechanics similar to Hyper Light Drifter with a dash that can be used to cross pits and a shield that protects the player from projectiles.

Radio the Universe promises to deliver an open world that connects many areas in a network of pathways that encourage exploration. What made me keep an eye on Radio the Universe was sixe's desire to create a game that not only is fun to play, but also imparts a special experience to the player.

An unnamed protagonist whiles away aeons in deep, solitudinous sleep. She watches the tides in sunstruck dreams of an empty shore, patiently waiting for her life to end. Alone in a skyless and desolate labyrinth-city , there isn't much else to do. But then...

SCALE

SCALE is a first-person reality manipulation game developed by Steve Swink, written by Dale Beran, with music composed by Mike Wright, Ben Prunty, and Danny Baranowsky. SCALE has a unique visual style opting for low poly 3D models with simple textures instead of highly detailed 3D models.

Progression in SCALE is freeform so there is an emphasis placed on exploration and discovering secrets similar to Super Mario 64. What is really compelling about SCALE is the unique scaling mechanic that allows the player to grow and shrink objects at will.

You play as young physics savant Penny Prince, inventor of a device which can suck the size out of one thing and shoot it into another. SCALE begins as Penny awakes in prison, convicted of 9,322,591 counts of Depraved Heart Murder for accidentally destroying the east coast. Someone has confiscated her cat. Against the express advice of the rehabilitative therapy coordinator now living inside her brain, she hastily reconstructs her device using materials from a nearby cellphone recycling bin and embarks upon escape in an attempt to regain her freedom and her cat.