ByJeremy Barnes, writer at Creators.co
Bill Shakespeare once wrote that we can only reach true happiness through the guidance of Sonic the Hedgehog and that robot from Halo.
Jeremy Barnes

If you bought one of the original (rather large) PlayStation 3 consoles, you might have a check for $55 dollars coming your way.

Back in 2010, Sony released a firmware update for the PS3 that would "disable the 'Install Other OS' feature," namely used to install Linux, available on the original PS3 "fat" systems. The decision to remove the feature was apparently an attempt to curb potential pirates from ripping and distributing unauthorized games, movies, and other content from the system. Sony claims that the update was voluntary; however without updating to the latest firmware version, PS3 owners would be locked out of PSN and the ability to access any future content that required the latest firmware version.

To make a long story short, some PS3 owners got mad, mustered up a legal team, and took Sony to court with a class-action lawsuit.

Six years later, it appears that Sony and the disgruntled PS3 owners have reached a settlement that now awaits approval from a US court judge. Any affected owner of the original PS3 model can appeal to Sony to receive either $55 or $9 in damages. With over 10 million affected PS3 gamers, it's estimated that Sony could pay millions of dollars in settlement fees.

In order to receive the $55, the proposed statement posits that the customer "must attest under oath to their purchase of the product and installation of Linux, provide proof of their purchase or serial number and PlayStation Network Sign-in ID, and submit some proof of their use of the Other OS functionality." In order to receive $9, the affected party must claim that they "knew about the Other OS, relied upon the Other OS functionality, and intended to use the Other OS functionality" when they purchased their console.

Because this settlement is still awaiting approval from a judge, the terms and amounts of money are still up in the air.

A link to the full settlement can be found here (courtesy of arstechnica.com).